marathon

August 13, 2013 7:28 PM

fml.jpg 2 and 3!! all 100 remaining pages of cp4 sketched and all that’s left is inking and toning until the end of time :D

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As of right now I am at page 89!! I remember last summer when I was marathoning book 3, I was able to up my page ink rate from 1 to 2 per day. These days I’ve been doing 3 pages a day and it’s a little surprising to me that there was still room for improvement. I’m not sure if it’s because I separated the sketch process or if it’s because recent pages are easy to ink or if it’s because I’ve been watching documentaries that kept me focused, but whatever it is I NEED IT TO KEEP WORKING OUT so I can finish book 4 in time :c

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Finding non spoiler panels to take pictures of is so hard ):

and here’s to show everyone what bonus story they’ll be missing out on for not buying book 4 D:<
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some clouds

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And tiny updates to the list of signs with juby’s help (: I’m left with 2 rather uncomfortable  signs for the last 2 characters that don’t really fit them HAHA… I kind of see virgos as picky hard to work with folk, and sagittariuses as a bit too almost absent minded in the way they easily move on from things, maybe I can balance them out with sun/moons? idk

♈ – Iriel
♉ – Weirin, ♈ asc ♍  moon
♊ – Rae
♋ – Desair
♌ – Auresque, mr villain
♍ –
♎ – Meron
♏ – Blackbird, ♒ asc

♑ – Veloce, ♏ asc ♉ moon
♒ – Vocruen
♓ – Keritzel, ♎ asc ♋ moon?

5 Comments

  • Michael

    Do you still have time to play games? What MMOs are you into recently?

  • Helios

    Shoot for 5 pages a day next summer! Keri shall play soothing violin music in the background.

    Secret extra story! Those are always a pleasure to read, next to pages in the main story that haven't been released online yet. Auresque! I don't care what shenanigans you're trying to con young!Rae into, I'm just glad to see you active in a timeline (also mr. villain?? what are you planning Shilinnn)

  • Zerasu

    Just curious do you draw manga for a living now? If so, how well do the art sustain you in terms of financial means? Or do you work other jobs as well to help pay for the bills? This line of work looks like it requires a massive amount of discipline to keep up with deadlines and publication dates to be viable on its own. Even then with regards to recession and poor NA economy trying to earn a living on it seems tight. Your insight is much appreciated. Thank you.

    - Long time fan

    • Hi! You threw me off haha, you go by the same handle another one of my long time fans whom I've talked to also go by XD My answer will be a bit long winded, sorry if I end up running with some things.

      To answer your question, I do use art to support myself without relying on extra work, by selling my manga books and my artbook, and my other art as prints online and at conventions I go to. It depends a lot on you to piece together different smaller "jobs" to make up your whole income. some people get a fulltime job and don't worry about that, others take private commissions from all spectrum and make ends meet, others work on multiple games and cd/book covers and their own comics at the same time. I see it as a choice of lifestyle, especially if you're not simply going for art because your heart and soul belongs to drawing. The freelance aspect of an art career is suitable for people who wants to be in control of what they do. Most of these people don't do commissions/work for companies because they passionately care about individual people who commission them or the obscure games they work on that are not really their genre. They choose it to have peace of mind that they're in control.

      Some people are fine with working themselves to death every day 7 days a week to make ends meet because to them, it's not work and they enjoy all moments of it. In that case the "discipline" you talk about isn't an issue, they're not restraining themselves; in fact they are letting themselves go nuts and are unable to control themselves and add a few more health beneficial activities in their routines. While I'm not this extreme, this is the category I fall into, especially these days where I am churning out pages. This deadline I set for book 4 is really arbitrary and doesn't effect my income much. It's not that I need to finish it in time or I'll starve (if that were the case and I don't want a hard deadline, I could also choose to do a kickstarter or start a preorder much earlier, have the same monetary benefits and still not have to overwork), but I choose to do it because I want to publish before christmas every year. I am able to do this because I don't treat what I do as what most working class would call work; it's still labour, but it's not a mental mountain to climb, and as you know, positive motivation makes things a lot easier. I am also able to pace myself because I am making a bit more than I need to spend; I'm sure there are those out there who doesn't think art is work, but it feels like work because they are not making enough and so their deadlines are real and they stress. No one wants to be in that position, as it turns an art career into any other career you could have and completely makes pursuing art over everything else–because you enjoy it–pointless since you wouldn't enjoy it anymore.

      The greatest thing about freelance career is its versatility. There are so many things you can do with art, your clients would range from individuals who just want to see something they come up with realized, to big clients who will use your work to make even more money. Even the major recessions won't effect everyone single one of them, and you have the choice to find those who will pay you best for your work at any given time. I don't expect to be able to continue my manga forever, although I would love to, and I certainly don't expect conventions to be this lucrative and grow indefinitely (as I've seen it grow from a farmer's market like phenomenon to resembling a major single-weekend mall). When these individuals grow bored of/become incapable to afford these products, I better be ready to either come up with something else they might want, or look for someone else who has the money to exchange for my skill/experience. As long as an artist knows approximately how to reach those who would appreciate them, sources of those who needs the talents of an artist is rarely low these days. I see this the best in artist alleys where people who I don't think draws well at all or has any industry credit/education background would makes a few folds what I make. With a love for what you do and a flexible, accepting, innovative mind, an art career can be great in many ways.

      That said, it doesn't often workout that way, otherwise every artist would be a happy one in the world. Brilliant ideas don't just come to people who want one; most of the time we happen across them by accident, such is my case. Most artists end up struggling in the equivalent of a low wage job they don't want, slaving away drawing things they don't want to draw, because they don't have the means to reach the place where their skill is most valuable. In my opinion, barring exceptional situations like you have absolutely no choice for any career except art, or you love art so much you would die if you cant do it, choosing art as a career should be a choice of practicality. Does this lifestyle suit you? Do you have the means and the resources to invest into getting your career started? Can you afford failure? are others affected if you fail? Is it sustainable? If anyone answers no to some of these questions, unless they are willing to work non-art on the side (nothing wrong with that) I would suggest against doing art as a career.